Whole Health

Should I Eat Before I Work Out?

Should one exercise on an empty stomach (Fasted) or have a snack beforehand.  It depends!  The table below describes the differing scenarios.

Training Type

Non-Fasted

Fasted

Endurance Athlete:

* Training Low,  low glycogen (energy) stores.

NO

To improve metabolic efficiency: body will adapt to use fat for fuel (can go longer before ‘hitting the wall’).

The desired effect is not immediate.

Maximize performance Eat before exercise: have snack/meal high in carbs, low fat with some protein:

Maintains energy & delays fatigue; augment performance, stay sharp; maintain blood sugar.

NO

Strength and muscle gains (hypertrophy- increase muscle size) Eat a meal with protein (easily digestible) & carbs before workout for energy needed to perform & to increase muscle mass.

NO

High Intensity Interval Training Need carbohydrates for fuel.  Also, need nutrition to maintain/gain muscle mass.  Otherwise body will break down lean tissue (muscle) for energy.

NO

Weight Loss   Helps to ‘burn fat’  BUT  also need to be mindful of caloric intake for the rest of the day.  Do not overeat afterwards.
Make sure to eat after exercising to rebuild muscle and reduce muscle soreness.  Consume carbohydrates and easily digestible protein, but not fat. Fat does not digest quickly so it would not be accessible for recovery.
*Rikki Keen, MS, RD, a certified specialist in sports dietetics and certified strength and conditioning specialist says, “science has shown placing the muscle in a stressful state of low glycogen levels during selected aerobic training sessions can trigger a cascade of hormonal and gene signaling that further enhance training adaptations within the muscle cell.”
Fitness

REPS / STRETCH/ FLEX CLASS

Nancy L (ACE certified)  @  NancyLFitness.com is offering:

REPS / STRETCH/ FLEX CLASS

Monday, Wednesday and Friday

9:15 am-10:00 am & 12:00 pm-12:45 pm

Stretching, Balance and Strength Training and Flexibility Exercises

Questions:  Call Nancy L @ 541-921-7875.   Cost: $4.00 per class.   Location:  Nancy L’s on Devil’s Lake.

Bring a friend & start having fun.

SMILE…. BREATHE… AND FEEL GREAT!!!!!

Fitness, Whole Health

Calories Burned with Housework, Everyday Chores and Other Activities

Turn housework into a workout.  Ironing, washing dishes, cooking, raking leaves, walking the dog, everyday activities and recreation all burn calories.

Of course, the number of calories burned varies with each person, depending on weight of the individual and the intensity that one uses attacking the task.  It does not always have to be task oriented either!  Fun stuff like hiking counts, too.

For example, assuming a 150 lb. person with average basal metabolic rate for 30 minutes of movement, the average calories burned per task are:

         Task                       Calories

  • Walking (brisk)                   ~ 150 
  • Gardening                           ~ 200 
  • Washing & waxing car        ~ 300 
  • Riding a bike                       ~ 300 to 400 
  • Raking leaves                     ~ 150 
  • Dancing                               ~ 230 
  • Swimming                           ~ 250 
  • Skiing                                  ~ 225 Alpine; ~300 Cross Country
  • Climbing stairs                    ~ 100 per 10 minutes.
Help yourself stay in shape through general household chores!
Fitness

Don’t Like Push-Ups? Try This

When performing push-ups, exercise results are augmented for the amount of effort applied.  In other words, you get “more bang for your buck” because multiple muscle groups are being activated.  You can get toned and stronger (arms, shoulders, chest, back, legs and abs) sooner.

BUT push-ups are no fun and they are hard to do!!

Try this:  start with wall push-ups.  These will help build up your strength gradually, progressing to the traditional horizontal push-up. The benefits of Push-Ups are many:

  • Build strength and stamina
  • Help develop a fit upper body and core
  • Work multiple muscle groups
  • Burn calories / lose weight
  • Do them anywhere
  • Increase difficulty as strength increases
  • No equipment needed.

The muscles summoned and exercised are:

  • Chest, pectoralis major
  • Shoulder, deltoids
  • Upper arm (back of), triceps
  • Arms, biceps
  • Abs, rectus abdominis & obliques
  • Back, erector spinae
  • Legs (front of thighs), quadriceps.

To maximize results, use proper Wall Push-Up form:

wallpushup_blog  Wall Push-Up

  1. Face wall, standing an arm’s distance away.
  2. Place your palms flat on the wall, finger tips up. Hands should be at shoulder height and slightly wider than shoulder width distance apart.
  3. Lean in toward the wall, bending elbows.
  4. Keep heels on the floor and abs contracted.
  • Keep body straight like a plank (feet under hips).
  • Elbows up.
  • Do not let hips sag.
  1. Hold a few seconds.
  2. Then, push away bearing body weigh on arms, back to starting position.

While performing push-ups and increasing the number of reps, muscles will begin to fatigue.  To forestall this fatigue, breathe with control so that the muscles may receive adequate oxygen.  When doing a wall (or regular) push-up:

  • inhale as you bend your elbows
  • exhale as you straighten them.

To increase difficulty:

  • Place feet farther away from the wall, making the body more horizontal.
  • Keep your heels on the floor
  • Perform push-up from this vantage point.

Another variation is the Push-Up to Standing:

pushuptostanding_blog  Push-Up to Standing

  1. Inhale, lower body to push-up/plank position.  Elbows are next to the ribs
  2. Exhale, pushing arms to straight position.
  3. Inhale walking hands back to feet.
  4. Maintain forward bend position, hanging like a rag doll.
  5. Exhale, rolling spine up to standing position
  6. Inhale, repeat sequence back down to push-up position.
  7. Repeat steps 2 through7.
Fitness, Seniors

Exercise – Reduce the Risk for Dementia.

How does exercise work to help prevent dementia?

As aging occurs the brain begins to shrink, specifically the hippocampus.  The hippocampus is the area of the brain involved with memory function. 

Exercising helps to increase the size of the hippocampus.  Not only does exercise work to slow brain shrinkage; it also aids in:

  • lowering high blood pressure
  • promoting blood vessel flexibility (to maintain blood flow to the brain)
  • creating new neurons (for the transmission of nerve impulses)
  • enhancing mental capability
  • reducing stress.

Aerobic / high intensity exercise also increases levels of the brain protein that works to repair and protect the brain. 

Strength training is important too.  It:

  • improves mental skills and cognitive function
  • develops muscle mass for improved bone density, balance, resting metabolic rate (bigger muscles burn more calories).

 

 

Wellness, Whole Health

Flex, Stretch and Compute

As we sit at the computer our shoulders are usually forward and we are hunched over for extended periods of time.  Our bodies are not designed to sit all day. Sitting for long periods of time (10 hours or more per day) has a negative effect on health: circulation decreases, muscles tire, and tasks become more uncomfortable to perform.

It can cause pain and tightness in the back and neck, tingling in the extremities and poor posture.  Along with this, there are also increases in the risk of heart disease, Type II Diabetes and some cancers.

Immediately after sitting down, muscle electrical activity and metabolism (maintenance and function processes) slow down as a result less calories are burned (1 calorie per minute is burned while sitting, 1/3 of what the body burns when walking).

After a prolonged period of this lifestyle, LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) increases and weight gain occurs.  [Also, sitting after eating a meal causes high blood sugar spikes. Instead move around after eating to cut the sugar spikes in half … move around, clean the kitchen, walk the dog.]

After just two weeks of sitting, muscles begin to atrophy (shrink and weaken) and oxygen consumption (use) decreases, making it more difficult to climb stairs and walk the longer distances.  Incorrect computer posture habits combined with long-term sitting may cause medical problems such as:  cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) or repetitive stress injury (RSI).

It has also been shown that in women bone mass can drop by 1% after a year of sitting for 6 hours a day.  Reduce these effects of long term sitting; take breaks; switch things up:

  • Stand every 45 minutes to 1 hour (set an alarm or timer). Standing up for 1 – 2 minutes every hour will reduce the negative effects of sitting all day.
  • March in place for twenty seconds.
  • Reach down and try to touch your toes for twenty seconds.
  • Wander around and pick up or reorganize for twenty seconds.
  • Maintain intervals of moderate activity during the day.

Below are examples of some exercises / stretches that can be performed without leaving your desk area.  Set your timer to take breaks and go for it!  Start small and slowly work your way up to more movement.

neckflexorNeck Flexors, Sitting or Standing

  1. Stand (or sit) head comfortable in a centered position.
  2. Draw in chin pulling head straight back.  Keep jaw and eyes level.
  3. Hold this position for 5 to 7 seconds.  Release. 
  4. Repeat.

standingbendSide/Torso – Standing Bend

  1. Stand with feet together and palms overhead touching.
  2. Bend body to one side as far as possible.
  3. Hold 5 to 7 seconds.
  4. Resume original position.
  5. Bend body to the other side as far as possible.
  6. Hold 5 to 7 seconds.
  7. Resume original position.

chest-scapula-adductionChest Scapula Adduction with Pectorals

  1. Stand in a doorframe, palms against frame and arms at 90 degrees.
  2. Lean forward, squeezing shoulder blades together.
  3. Hold 7 to 10 seconds.
  4. Release, then repeat.

hipflexorHip Flexors/Quadriceps Stretch

  1. Stand, may use chair as a support.
  2. Slowly bend left leg feeling the stretch.
  3. Hold for 7 to 10 seconds.
  4. Release.
  5. Repeat with other leg.

dorsiflexionDorsiflexion and Plantar Flexion, sitting

  1. Sitting with feet on the floor.
  2. Point toes up while keeping heels on the floor.
  3. Hold position 5 to 7 seconds.
  4. Now, press toes to the floor while raising heels.
  5. Hold position 5 to 7 seconds.
  6. Repeat several times.

 

upperback-stretchUpper/Mid Back Stretch, sitting

  1. Sitting in chair with knees apart, bend forward toward the floor.
  2. Feel the stretch in the lower back.
  3. Hold 7 to 10seconds.
  4. Sit upright.
  5. Repeat.
Wellness, Whole Health

Introducing: Climber Bee Hand Care and Moisturizer Product

Hand Made by local bee keepers in Utah

Inspired by a heritage of beekeeping and a desire for natural healing, the Climber Bee lotion bar was created using very simple ingredients: beeswax, shea butter, and high quality oils.  All the hand balms have Yarrow essential oil in them as a key ingredient. Yarrow has many health benefits.

The use of essential oils with healing properties makes the product unique and keeps the scents natural.  Also unique is its versatility.  Created by a rock climber to use as a moisturizer and healing salve for the hands, it also works on feet before hiking to reduce rubbing; reduces chaffing at the seat during long bike rides; can be used as a hair pomade, or lip balm.  Necessity is the mother of invention!   Be creative and discover new uses.

For years, the product has been field tested on many climbing trips and in homes by friends and family.  The feedback guided the fine tuning of Climber Bees formula and its packaging.

The thicker lotion bar texture is a salve that provides for skin repair. Packaged in a sturdy 2 oz metal container the entire bar comes out of the container and is rubbed directly over the skin as needed. The friction generated by rubbing the bar between your hands warms the product to allow smooth application.

Cheers to healthy hands!

Ingredients:  Shea Butter, Avocado Oil, Beeswax, Yarrow Essential Oil, Other Essential Oils.

Uses:  Skin repair,  Friction reducer,  Lip balm, Hair Pomade

Available from:  Climber Bee, PO Box 2746Cedar City, UT 84721

Ph: 435.267.7447  or http://www.etsy.com/shop/ClimberBee

Fitness

Maximize Weight Loss During Resistance Training

To maximize weight loss during your resistance (weight lifting) training workouts:

  1. Concentrate on endurance (stamina, staying power).
  • Do extra repetitions (reps) at lower weight.
  1. Perform high-intensity interval training (HIIT)
  • Increase intensity (push yourself harder) for a short period of time and then take a break.
  • This works all your energy systems in a single workout, strengthening the cardiovascular system while burning extra calories.
  1. Target multiple muscle groups in the same exercise with compound exercises (see examples  below).
  • Compound exercises will help burn lots of calories and excess fat because more muscles are utilized.
  1. Increase protein consumption.
  • Ingesting protein right after resistance training helps the body recover from the workout.
  • This also helps build muscle, improving body composition.
  • The body uses calories to maintain muscle.  So, extra muscle will burn extra calories.

Examples of Compound exercises:

Kettlebell Swings – works the quads (front of thighs), hamstrings (back of thighs), core, back, shoulders; improves cardiovascular strength and endurance.

  1. Start with:
  • toes pointing out (to accommodate the kettlebell),
  • feet apart for stability (wider than shoulders).
  1. Keep back and head straight, focus on a spot across the room.
  2. Squat down so that knees are bent and heels are close to the back of the thigh and hips are pushed back.
  3. Lifting up the kettlebell; snap it back between your legs so that it extends through the legs and out behind.
  4. The kettlebell will now begin to lower.  When it is at its complete decline straighten up, thrusting the pelvis to propel the kettlebell forward to chest height.
  5. Stand erect with shoulders back, as the kettlebell lowers, squat down slightly with hips back.  Repeat movement.

Note:  during the exercise –

  • Keep abs tight.
  • Breathe!!
  • Maintain a solid grip on the kettlebell handle.
  • Push hips back; stretch the hamstrings.
  • Drive the hips to do the work.
  • Keep the lower back tight, maintaining the arch.

 

Back Rows – works the back, shoulders, arms, core (rear deltoids, rhomboids, teres major, trapezius and levator scapulae, latissimus dorsi arnd spinal erectors).

  1. Starting position:
  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell in each hand
  • Bending at the waist bring torso forward; keep back straight, knees slightly bent and head up.
  • Arms are fully extended hanging directly in front (palms supinated, facing torso).
  1. Contract back muscles, engaging the core, bend the arms towards the body, and pull both dumbbells at a 90 degree angle up to ribcage.
  2. Lift (row) the dumbbells up until upper arms are parallel to ribcage/torso.
  3. Hold for about one second in this top position.
  4. Then, slowly (3-5 seconds) lower the weight back to the starting position.
  5. Repeat for 8 to 10 reps (repetitions).

Note:  This exercise is not recommended for people with back problems/issues.

During the exercise:

  • Be cautious with the weight, using less weight rather than more.
  • Breathe!!
  • Ensure perfect form: Keep back straight throughout.; Only the arms should move; Avoid rounding the upper back; Keep the neck neutral, spine flat, and shoulders back.
  • Perform exercise with a slow tempo; avoid jerking the weights.

With most exercises, supervision by someone with expertise can benefit beginners.

Follow the link below for a yummy (protein enriched) post workout smoothie recipe.

https://fitcui.com/news

Nutrition

Avocado: Awesome & Alimentative

Avocados, originating from Mexico and Central America, were first used as food at about 10,000 BC.  Also called alligator pear, they are very nutritious and provide for many health benefits when consumed.  A single Avocado contains:

  • 9 grams carbohydrate
  • 15 grams of healthy fats (low in saturated fat)
  • Vitamin K
  • Folate
  • Potassium (100 g – more than in a banana)
  • Vitamin B5
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin E
  • Fiber (27% of the recommended daily amount)
  • Lutein and Zeaxanthin (to help protect the eyes)
  • Included, too, is Magnesium, Manganese, Copper, Iron, Zinc, Phosphorous, Vitamin A, Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin.

Eating avocados will also:

  • Lower LDL and triglycerides
  • Increase HDL
  • Help with the absorption of nutrients and antioxidants.

Eat them for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. Try one or all of these tasty Avocado dishes:

Breakfast – Breakfast Egg & Avocado Tostada 150 Calories per Tostada

Ingredients

4 corn tostadas
4 eggs
¼ tsp. cumin
¼  tsp. black pepper
¼ tsp. fine sea salt
¼ tsp. oregano
pinch chili powder
pinch paprika
2 Tbsp. milk
1 to 2 Tbsp. Canola oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup diced bell pepper mix
½ cup chopped red onion
1 ripe Avocado, peeled and pitted
4 Tbsp. shredded pepper jack cheese
4 slices ripe tomato
Plain Greek Yogurt – garnish, Salsa – optional

Instructions

  1. Place the tostados on a baking sheet.  Set aside.
  2. Cut avocado into twelve slices.
  3. Squeeze lemon or lime juice over it and gently toss. Set aside.
  4. In a large skillet, Canola oil over medium heat.
  5. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring frequently, until fragrant.
  6. Add pepper and onion and cook until soft, about 5 minutes.
  7. When vegetables are soft, add the eggs.
  8. Stir to scramble, about 3 minutes, until done. Remove from heat.
  9. Turn oven broiler on to heat while assembling the tostadas.
  10. Place one tomato slice on tostada.
  11. Add ¼ of the egg mixture to each tomato slice.
  12. Top with three slices of avocado.
  13. Sprinkle 1 Tbsp. of cheese on each tostadas.
  14. Place under the broiler for 1-2 minutes, until the cheese melts.  Serve immediately.
  15. Garnish with Salsa and Greek Yogurt, as desired.

 

LunchTuna Avocado Salad – 4 Servings, Calories per serving: 160

Ingredients

  • 1 large or 2 medium Avocados, peeled and pitted
  • 10 oz albacore tuna, in water
  • Lemon Pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Using a fork, mash up the tuna really well until the consistency is even.
  2. Mix in the avocado until smooth.
  3. Add salt & pepper, to taste.
  4. May serve on toast or in a salad.

 

Dinner Macaroni and Cheese and Avocado ~ 6 Servings

Calories per serving: 450

Ingredients

10 ounces dry elbow macaroni or other pasta, whole wheat
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 medium avocados, peeled and pitted
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

½ Cup chopped chives
Lemon pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup skim milk
2 cups (reduced fat) shredded Pepper Jack cheese or Monterey Jack or White Cheddar Cheese or combination of all 3, depending on desired taste
Fresh avocado slices

Directions

  1. Bring water to a boil in a large pot.
  2. Add pasta to boiling water
  3. Cook ~10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, make the avocado sauce:
  • Put the garlic, avocados, lime juice, cilantro and Lemon Pepper into a food processor / blender.
  • Process until smooth and creamy. Set aside.
  1. Make the cheese sauce:
  • Place butter in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat.
  • When butter is melted, whisk in flour to create a paste.
  • Whisk in milk until smooth.
  • Stir with a wooden spoon until the sauce starts to thicken.
  • Add in cheese and stir until cheese is melted, creating a creamy sauce.
  1. Place macaroni in a large bowl.
  2. Pour the avocado sauce over the macaroni and stir until well coated.
  3. Add the cheese sauce and stir until macaroni is coated and creamy.
  4. Season with Lemon Pepper, to taste.
  5. Garnish with the avocado slices.
  6. Serve warm.