Fitness, Wellness, Whole Health

Weight Loss Facts

Slim down at a slow and steady rate, eat less / move more:

  • There are 3500 calories in a pound of fat.
  • It is safe to lose 1.5 to 2.0 pounds per week.
  • It is generally unsafe to lose more than 2.0 pounds per week.
  • To lose 1 pound per week, you need a daily reduction of 500 calories/day, which is a reduction of 3500 calories/week.

To achieve a reduction of 500 calories per day, for losing 1 pound/week:

Reduce caloric consumption by 500 calories/day.

Or, ideally, eat less and move more.  Eat 250 calories less per day.  Plus, exercise to burn 250 calories.

To lose 2 pounds per week, double the above number:  1000 calorie/day reduction, 7000 calories per week.

Caloric values for some favorite, but unhealthy  foods:

Food                                                      Calories
Bacon, 1 slice                                          44
Beer, 1 can                                             154
Bread, 1 slice white                               79
Cereal, sugared, ¾ Cup                        100
Chips, potato, 1 oz                                 152
Cookie, 1 oz butter cookie                   132
Cracker, 5 regular size                           81
French fries, 1 med serving                  365
Ice Cream, ½ cup vanilla                     137
Soda, 12 oz. can                                      150
Pizza, 1 slice                                            285

Caloric values for some favorite, healthy foods:

Food                                                      Calories
Apple, 1                                                     95
Banana, 1                                                105
Brown rice, ½ Cup                                 108
Carrots, 1 med.                                          25
Chicken breast, 3 oz.                              140
Cheese, 1 slice, American                       104
Dark chocolate, 1 oz.                               155
Eggs, 1 lg. boiled                                        78
Green beans, 1 Cup                                    31
Salmon, 3 oz., raw                                     177
Walnuts, ¼ Cup                                        180

Conclusion:

To keep the pounds off after losing weight, a change in lifestyle is recommended.  Do the math!  Adjust your daily energy balance to achieve your desired calorie reduction.  Stay away from excess sugar and fat.

Whole Health

Should I Eat Before I Work Out?

Should one exercise on an empty stomach (Fasted) or have a snack beforehand.  It depends!  The table below describes the differing scenarios.

Training Type

Non-Fasted

Fasted

Endurance Athlete:

* Training Low,  low glycogen (energy) stores.

NO

To improve metabolic efficiency: body will adapt to use fat for fuel (can go longer before ‘hitting the wall’).

The desired effect is not immediate.

Maximize performance Eat before exercise: have snack/meal high in carbs, low fat with some protein:

Maintains energy & delays fatigue; augment performance, stay sharp; maintain blood sugar.

NO

Strength and muscle gains (hypertrophy- increase muscle size) Eat a meal with protein (easily digestible) & carbs before workout for energy needed to perform & to increase muscle mass.

NO

High Intensity Interval Training Need carbohydrates for fuel.  Also, need nutrition to maintain/gain muscle mass.  Otherwise body will break down lean tissue (muscle) for energy.

NO

Weight Loss   Helps to ‘burn fat’  BUT  also need to be mindful of caloric intake for the rest of the day.  Do not overeat afterwards.
Make sure to eat after exercising to rebuild muscle and reduce muscle soreness.  Consume carbohydrates and easily digestible protein, but not fat. Fat does not digest quickly so it would not be accessible for recovery.
*Rikki Keen, MS, RD, a certified specialist in sports dietetics and certified strength and conditioning specialist says, “science has shown placing the muscle in a stressful state of low glycogen levels during selected aerobic training sessions can trigger a cascade of hormonal and gene signaling that further enhance training adaptations within the muscle cell.”